The 13th Adventure Club Podcast: Off To The Movies

As we enter a 10-day period of relative quiet in the Sands (story-wise) relating to October 6 – 15, we use the spare time to go to the movies. Thanks to Arthur Beale, we got to watch the 1978 film version of The Riddle of the Sands with 40-50 other ROTS fans, and the bulk of this podcast is dedicated to celebrating what turned out to be an excellent evening.

First up, though, we urge you again to pledge your support for the Adventure Club – just £25 gets you the Handbook Edition of this classic adventure book, a ‘field’ audio book and access to a month-long web adventure. http://unbound.co.uk/books/riddle-of-the-sands (01:20)

A tip of the hat to our hosts Arthur Beale and the purchase of a 1-3/8-inch galvanised rigging screw (06:04); Lloyd (notDavies) runs us through some basic facts about the 1978 film version of The Riddle of the Sands. (07:29); we meet the composer of the movie soundtrack, Howard Blake, who gives us some insight into how movie music gets made.(09:11); Lloyd gets to meet Club Member Aunt Liz, who disses him about his rope skills (14:55); another treat from Film Club night – maritime artist Martyn Mackrill brings along a wonderful painting of ‘The Dulcibella’ and briefly talks us through its conception (16:47). 

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York & MacCorkindale

Someone attending the Film Club night reveals they own a Rippingille stove!(21:16); a discussion about ‘the row to Memmert’ and the perils of running too far ahead in the story (22:24); our main impressions of the film, starting with the rather obvious anti-German tropes and the shadow of two world wars.(25:27); the stepmother (26:40); the radical changes to the story in the opening and the ending of the film (27:01)

Club member Kevin challenges the presence of the Kaiser in the film (28:20) and uses a detailed knowledge of times and dates to identify Tirpitz as a much more likely person to be involved in a nefarious naval plan in October 1898 (31:33); Lloyd gets upset about the number of deaths in the film and we discuss the merits of murder in action movies (35:14).

NEXT WEEK: there’s talk of a trip to Norfolk to see a man with a boat that is a bit like The Medusa, and a proposed visit to a clothes shop that might kit us out in Norfolk jackets (37:41); ahoy to Oliver at Brooks who is focussing our minds on the cycling element of our proposed Adventure (38:43).

3 thoughts on “The 13th Adventure Club Podcast: Off To The Movies

  1. The Kaiser might have had an easily recognised figure because of his atrophied left arm, 6″ short, due to a botched breech birth.
    It is alleged that the severe training he had to overcome this disability and the disdain shown by some of his extended family contributed to his emotional behaviour and his marked hostility to Britain.

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  2. Really enjoyed the film night.

    The film did portray the Kaiser as having an issue with one of his arms, so there was authenticity there.

    I liked the stuff about Frau Dollman, and thought I recognised her. Sure enough courtesy of Internet Movie Database the actress, Olga Lowe, was in Where Eagles Dare, about to inject some truth serum before coming to a sticky end – again. Just three other bits of useless trivia about her; she started her career supporting the fruit wearing Carmen Miranda, she performed in the Foiles Bergere, and she was on stage with Sid James when he died of a heart attack.

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  3. One minor point – the mizzen mast discussed at the very end of this podcast appeared at the start of the book before Carruthers got to Flensberg. Davis had had it stepped by the anonymous carpenter (who also repaired the rudder fastenings damaged in the Dollman episode) and it was remarked upon by Bartels at his first meeting with our heroes in Denmark.

    Sailing under “headsails and mizzen alone” would have caused the yacht to sail slowly and under easy control while they were surveying the sands.

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